I am back and that is what it is.

19 Sept 2016.

So I am coming back to writing. There is so much I want to cover: The elections. sex trafficking and sexual violence, foreign policy, “terrorism, veterans issues,  society and matters of war and peace.   I have had so many issues living in my head and I have to talk about them. Plus, a lot of people want me to get back to writing.

See a lot of ignorance as well that I have to call out. We have the least qualified presidential candidate to ever run for president tying in the polls with arguably the most qualified candidate to have ever run.  Sex trafficking and violence hasn’t gone anywhere and  Black Lives Matter is talking about serious issues that need to be discussed. You all know how much I love talk about war and peace as well as foreign policy  and there is so much to cover there. I also need to talk about the great American freak out that is called terrorism:   Be afraid of the boogie man boys and girls.

So yeah, I am back here. I hope to write here at least once a day though would like to write more than that. I am also getting back to my other blogs My Journey into Film and Schroyboy so I have a lot of writing ahead. I want writing to be apart of my everyday life. I want to be known for my writings and the only way to do that is to write and write well. I know a lot of people want me to start again and I know this is what I am suppose to be doing.

Congress needs to put veterans first

Today, the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee will hear testimony on the Commission on Care’s final report on reforming the Veterans Health Administration. The Veterans Service Organizations and the Department of Veterans Affairs were not invited to participate in today’s discussion. That’s too bad — the VA and the VSOs could have provided compelling details to back up the commission’s call for congressional action.

From my perspective, the report is overall a validation of the course the VA has been on since I took the helm over two years ago. The president and I agree with 15 of the report’s 18 recommendations, and the VA has already accomplished or has been working on 12 of these through our ongoing MyVA transformation. That includes the report’s main recommendation: building a high-performing integrated health system combining VA care and VA-purchased community care. We are already moving in that direction, and our efforts are already improving veterans’ access to healthcare.

Last year, veterans completed nearly 4 million more appointments than the previous year. In March, they set a record for appointments completed at the VA: 5.3 million, 730,000 more than March 2014. That same month, the VA issued 268,000 authorizations for care in the community — twice as many as March 2014. In July, 96 percent of appointments were completed within 30 days of veterans’ preferred dates, 85 percent were completed within seven days and 22 percent were completed the same day.

The average wait time is around five days for primary care, six days for specialty care and two days for mental healthcare. Ninety percent of veterans we’ve surveyed are “satisfied or completely satisfied” with the timeliness of their care. Just 3 percent say they are dissatisfied. That’s still too many, and we won’t be satisfied until no veteran is dissatisfied.

I doubt there will be much mention of these achievements at today’s hearing. I also doubt there will be much discussion of the commission’s finding that VA care compares favorably in clinical quality to care in the private sector. The Independent Assessment came to the same conclusion, but some people have more to gain by ignoring the facts than by a full and open examination of them.

The commission did not recommend privatizing VA healthcare. Neither has any VSO. Privatization would be a boon for private-sector healthcare companies, including those represented on the commission, but as seven leading VSOs told the commission in April, it “could threaten the financial and clinical viability of some VA medical programs and facilities,” which would “fall particularly hard on the millions of veterans who rely on VA for all or most of their care.”

I strongly disagree with the commission’s recommendation of an independent VA board of directors. The Constitution won’t allow it, and, to me, as a business executive, the idea doesn’t make any sense. It would only make matters worse by complicating the bureaucracy at the top and spreading the responsibility for veterans’ healthcare so that no one knows who’s ultimately responsible.

The fact is, we already have a board of directors: Congress. If Congress worked the way it should, nobody would be talking about adding another layer of bureaucracy.

Veterans need Congress to do its job as a board.

Last week, I sent the Senate and House Veterans’ Affairs committees a detailed letter outlining urgent actions needed just to maintain current levels of care. These include approving the president’s 2017 budget request to keep up with rising costs and medical innovation; extending authorities to maintain services like transportation to VA facilities in rural areas and vocational rehabilitation; fixing provider agreements to keep long-term care facilities from turning veterans out to avoid the hassle of current requirements; and ending the arbitrary rule that won’t let the VA’s dedicated, conscientious medical professionals care for veterans for more than 80 hours in any federal pay period.

Only Congress can fix these problems, just as only Congress can modernize our antiquated claims appeals process. We have submitted to Congress a modernization plan developed with the help of VSOs and other veterans advocates. We have also submitted a plan to consolidate our many community care programs to make community care easier for veterans, providers and the VA.

We need Congress to act on these proposals.

The Senate Appropriations Committee has at least approved a budget nearly equal to the president’s request, and the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee has unanimously approved the Veterans First Act. The act isn’t all veterans need. It doesn’t address appeals. But it’s a start.

The act is aptly named. It’s time to put politics, ideology and special interests aside. It’s time to put veterans first.

McDonald is the secretary of Veterans Affairs.

Free tuition and how Sanders fails at communicating this.

Free tuition is one of the best things we can do for this country. It just makes economic sense and it pays for itself.

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders is really bad at communicating ideas. This being one of them. Tuition free college pays for itself because the people that go to college get jobs and pay taxes thus paying back their tuition.

Also, it isn’t about redistribution. It is about fair distribution. The reason you are not making a good money is because money funnels to the top. This is what trickle down economics look like. You work hard for little so that the top become wealthier. This is why the Republicans have not had any new ideas on economics since Reagan.

Also, about taxes and why I am for the wealthy paying their fair share; which they do not now: Those of benefit the most from society should pay the most. It is that simple. They benefit from the military, infrastructure, our courts, labor, security and I could go on.

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders Is has been terrible at communicating that. He just runs around saying he is going to tax the rich. Which taxing them just because they have money without cause would be pretty unfair. But they benefit the most from America so they should pay the most.

So it is a good time to start working on this blog.

So with everything that is going on in the world and here in America, I think it is time that I start writing on here in Notes from Outpost 187. This is a blog about politics, foreign policy and social issue blog, and there is much to write about. For those who know me know I have opinions and thoughts  on a wide range of topics. I try my best to be thoughtful and take a Socratic approach to things. I also have a great interest in our world, and I want to share them with you all.  I am merely trying to add to the discussion and contribute to our democracy.

I also would love to hear your opinions and thoughts. Please try to thoughtful and polite, but if you can’t be, I forgive you.

We are failing at being number one. Post 1

We fail at being number one.

We refuse to spend the money required to be a great nation. And yes, the means big government.
Why? Because we do not want to tax the people and corporations who BENEFIT
the most from our society. Instead you are asked to pay the bill for these freeloaders.
Yes, the rich and corporations are freeloaders who also receive money from us: the citizens of the United States.

trains csadasdsa

Amnesty International Sex Worker Policy.

I support Amnesty International Sex Trade policy. As you know I am making a film about sex trafficking. I have an unflinching hatred for pimps and traffickers, and feel that law enforcement does not do enough to prevent it. Putting women ahead sex traffickers is a no brainer. So I would not support any policy that would help pimps and traffickers.  As it stands right now we leave women and children vulnerable to sex traffickers and pimps. Women have no recourse because prostitution is illegal.  Now we know that when the sex trade is legal, women do have recourse through law enforcement because they are no longer engaging in an illegal activity. New Zealand decriminalized the sex trade, now women go to the police and work with them when they are raped or assaulted. This is where we need to go.

Also there has been a lot of talk about traffickers having rights and that it will lead to more trafficking. This is not Amenity’s position Let me say this, there needs to be a full out  assault on pimps and sex traffickers by law enforcement from around the world. As it stands women and children are exploited by pimps and traffickers, yet they feel, and for good reason, that they cannot go to the police, for they, by being a prostitute, are engaging in an illegal activity.   This is a simple fact. Amnesty deals with the exploitation of women and children.

This is putting women first. And here is the new Amnesty International policy on the sex trade.

The International Council

REQUESTS the International Board to adopt a policy that seeks attainment of the highest possible protection of the human rights of sex workers, through measures that include the decriminalization of sex work, taking into account:

  1. The starting point of preventing and redressing human rights violations against sex workers, and in particular the need for states to not only review and repeal laws that make sex workers vulnerable to human rights violations, but also refrain from enacting such laws.
  2. Amnesty International’s overarching commitment to advancing gender equality and women’s rights.
  3. The obligation of states to protect every individual in their jurisdiction from discriminatory policies, laws and practices, given that the status and experience of being discriminated against are often key factors in what leads people to engage in sex work, as well as in increasing vulnerability to human rights violations while engaged in sex work and in limiting options for voluntarily ceasing involvement in sex work.
  4. The harm reduction principle.
  5. States have the obligation to prevent and combat trafficking for the purposes of sexual exploitation and to protect the human rights of victims of trafficking.
  6. States have an obligation to ensure that sex workers are protected from exploitation and can use criminal law to address acts of exploitation.
  7. Any act related to the sexual exploitation of a child must be criminalized. Recognizing that a child involved in a commercial sex act is a victim of sexual exploitation, entitled to support, reparations, and remedies, in line with international human rights law, and that states must take all appropriate measures to prevent sexual exploitation and abuse of children.
  8. Evidence that sex workers often engage in sex work due to marginalisation and limited choices, and that therefore Amnesty International will urge states to take appropriate measures to realize the economic, social and cultural rights of all people so that no person enters sex work against their will or is compelled to rely on it as their only means of survival, and to ensure that people are able to stop sex work if and when they choose.
  9. Ensuring that the policy seeks to maximize protection of the full range of human rights – in addition to gender equality, women’s rights, and non-discrimination – related to sex work, in particular security of the person, the rights of children, access to justice, the right to health, the rights of Indigenous peoples and the right to a livelihood.
  10. Recognizing and respecting the agency of sex workers to articulate their own experiences and define the most appropriate solutions to ensure their own welfare and safety, while also complying with broader, relevant international human rights principles regarding participation in decision-making, such as the principle of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent with respect to Indigenous peoples.
  11. The evidence from Amnesty International’s and external research on the lived experiences of sex workers, and on the human rights impact of various criminal law and regulatory approaches to sex work.
  12. The policy will be fully consistent with Amnesty International’s positions with respect to consent to sexual activity, including in contexts that involve abuse of power or positions of authority.
  13. Amnesty international does not take a position on whether sex work should be formally recognized as work for the purposes of regulation. States can impose legitimate restrictions on the sale of sexual services, provided that such restrictions comply with international human rights law, in particular in that they must be for a legitimate purpose, provided by law, necessary for and proportionate to the legitimate aim sought to be achieved, and not discriminatory.

The policy will be capable of flexible and responsive application across and within different jurisdictions, recognizing that Amnesty entities may undertake work on different aspects of this policy and can take an incremental approach to this work (in accordance with and within the limits of this policy) based on assessments of specific legal and policy contexts.

The International Board will ensure that, following the release of the final research report, Sections and structures have an opportunity to review and give feedback on the final draft policy before it is adopted.

Blacks don’t run. Whites get your guns

So here is what I have learned from Fox News: As Sean Hannity so well put it, black people don’t sell drugs. Funny thing about that under Reagan the CIA brought literally tons of cocaine into the United State and distributed it throughout black communities.   But in Reagan’s defense he was a white president serving a white America. So the destruction of black communities was not only acceptable but necessary.

Than Sean gave another bit of advice don’t run from the police. Because as we know, police are fair honest brokers, that represent the government out in our communities. Well versed in the Constitutions and carry around the Bill of Rights in their back pockets.

Now I also learned from Fox is that if you are white and owe a lot of money to the people of the United States of America it is not only perfectly fine to not pay what you owe, but it is perfectly alright to challenge our law enforcement agencies with guns.  As a matter of fact it is encouraged.  And best of all you will get support from some media outlets. Like Sean Hannity who will give you all the support you need.